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AthleticHub Blog

Joe Nocera is the new sports business columnist for The New York Times.I wrote my first article for The New York Times about the N.C.A.A. four years ago. Appearing in the magazine, it was headlined “Let’s Start Paying College Athletes.” Although I had been a college basketball fan all my life, I had never paid much attention to the inner workings of the N.C.A.A. But my research woke me up to the inequities faced by college football and men’s basketball players, and compelled me to begin writing regularly about how the N.C.A.A. and the college sports establishment exploit the players who generate the billions that the grown-ups pocket.The conceit for the original article was to imagine that the N.C.A.A.’s “amateurism” model — which, of course, enables that exploitation — had magically disappeared, finally allowing athletes...

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​More than a week has passed since Boston Pride forward Denna Laing crashed head-first into the boards at the Women's Winter Classic, and there has been no update on her condition other than she is still hospitalized at Massachusetts General Hospital and her family wishes for privacy at this time.

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This weekend, The New York Times Magazine will publish its annual “The Lives They Lived” issue, which recalls notable people who died in 2015. In my bailiwick, two of the more notable deaths were those of Jerry Tarkanian, the former basketball coach at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, who died in February at age 84, and Walter Byers, the former head of the N.C.A.A., who died in May. He was 93.Tarkanian, who was known as Tark the Shark and who coached for 31 years, has the seventh-highest winning percentage in men’s Division I history. Although his Runnin’ Rebels were best known for their fast-paced offense, no less an authority than Duke Coach Mike Krzyzewski has described Tarkanian as “arguably the best defensive coach in college basketball history.”Byers, who became the executive director of the N.C.A.A. in 1951 — a position he held for the next 37 years — transformed...

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Female coaches may be making strides in the pro leagues, but college sports are a different story.Female coaches were all over the headlines this summer. First was Becky Hammon of the San Antonio Spurs, who became the NBA’s first female head coach at Summer League—and brought home the League trophy. Then came the news that Nancy Lieberman will join Hammon in the NBA as assistant coach of the Sacramento Kings. And in football, Jen Welter was the first-ever woman to land a coaching internship in the NFL, though her gig has since ended.But with school starting back up, some sports fans are now turning their attention back to college athletics. And on campus, the picture for female coaches is decidedly less rosy.The percentage of women coached by women has declined to an all-time low, even while Title IX, which prohibits sex-based discrimination in any education...

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Eichel faces some tough decisions in the near future! In the past almost all athletes have chosen to jump into the NHL instead of staying back an playing another year at College.  The offseason will be interesting to see what decision Eichel makes! Stay tuned Sabres fans!!-----Jack Eichel isn’t even a member of an NHL franchise and he already has a tough decision to make.The consensus No. 2 overall pick will likely be spending his future in Buffalo with the Sabres, becoming buds with Evander Kane and Tyler Ennis, but when he’ll be doing that is a question only he can answer.Eichel’s alma mater Boston University – who he helped guide to the national championship game before losing to Providence – wants him back next season and the school is coming at the youngster with a full-court press for his services, Mike Harrington of The...

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You cannot underestimate the value of being a student-athlete.  Varsity athletes learn how to manage their time, dedicate themselves, compete in high pressure situations, work together to achieve a common goal, become great leaders and role models and the list could go on and on.  As a former college athlete myself, the lessons I learned during my time in University continues to be extremely valuable today.  Learn more about the values college sports provides to student-athletes in this article from NCAA.orgCLICK HERE to build your AthleticHub.com student-athlete profile to get one step closer to your dream of playing College Sport.------The advantages of competing in college sports are both immediate and lifelong. This list outlines the many benefits student-athletes receive by playing their chosen sport while pursuing a college degree.1. College EducationA college degree has a direct impact on a...

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College RecruitingThe NCAA supports student-athlete well-being by promoting a fair recruiting environment that limits intrusions into the lives of student-athletes and their families.Recruiting happens when a college employee or representative invites a high school student-athlete to play sports for their college. Recruiting can occur in many ways, such as face-to-face contact, phone calls or text messaging, through mailed or emailed material or through social media.Recruiting termsA contact happens any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face meeting with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.An evaluation happens when a college coach observes a student-athlete practicing or competing.A verbal commitment happens when a college-bound student-athlete verbally agrees to play sports for a college before he or she signs or is eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent. The commitment is not binding on the student-athlete or...

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OTTAWA (CIS) – The Windsor Lancers (women) and Carleton Ravens (men), both four-time reigning national champions, remain at No. 1 in the final coaches’ polls of the CIS basketball season.In other CIS sports, Alberta (men’s hockey), Toronto (women’s track & field) and Windsor (men’s track & field) also hold on to the pole position this week.In women’s hoops, Windsor (19-1) secured first place overall in the OUA on Saturday thanks to a 77-68 road win over No. 6 Laurier (17-3) in the regular season finale for both teams. The Lancers, who topped all 13 weekly polls this year, will host a conference quarter-final versus an opponent still to be determined on Saturday.In men’s basketball, Carleton (17-2) wrapped up league play this past weekend with convincing victories against Laurentian, 85-39, and Nipissing, 97-53. The Ravens, who led nine of 13 rankings this season, finished second behind No. 2 Ottawa (18-1) in...

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MONTREAL -- What started with 16 teams is now down to four as the OUA men's hockey conference finals are set to begin on Wednesday night. In the East Division, two familiar foes from "la belle province" meet in the playoffs for the fourth time in five seasons when the division-winning McGill Redmen (4-1), ranked sixth in the CIS Top 10, meet the No.8-UQTR Patriotes (4-0) in a best-of-three series.Game 1 of the series will be hosted by McGill on Wednesday, Feb. 25, at McConnell Arena (3883 University). Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for students and seniors. Children 12 and under are admitted free. Puck drop is at 7 p.m. The second contest is scheduled for Saturday night (7 pm) at Le Colisee in Trois-Rivieres. Should a rubber match be needed, it is slated for Sunday, 7 pm at McConnell Arena. All three games will be streamed live, with McGil's home games on SSN Canada and UQTR's...

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Here NCAA.com breaks down the complicated procedures involved with selecting, seeding and bracketing the teams involved in NCAA Men's Div. 1 Basketball National Championship. Learn about it!-----Each member of the Division I men's basketball committee evaluates a vast amount of information during selection process. Their opinions -- developed through observations, discussions with coaches, directors of athletics and commissioners, and review and comparison of data -- ultimately determine selections, seeding and bracketing. CLICK HERE FOR COMMITTEE PROFILESThere are three phases to the process to determine the 68 teams for the tournament:I. Select the 36 best at-large teams;II. Seed the field of 68 teams; andIII. Place the teams into the championship bracket.SELECTION, SEEDING, BRACKETINGThe process follows these basic principles: Reasonable competitive balance in each region of the bracket; The 36 best teams -- not otherwise automatic qualifiers for their conference -- fill the at-large berths. (There is no limit on the...

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